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An exciting chapter in the Bernie Gunther saga(0)

February 24, 2017

The Other Side of Silence (Bernie Gunther #11), by Philip Kerr @@@@ (4 out of 5) The Other Side of Silence is the 11th novel in Philip Kerr‘s bestselling series of detective stories featuring Bernie Gunther. (A 12th is forthcoming as I write.) However, unlike the books that precede it in the series, this suspenseful… Read More ›

British satire about misfit spies in MI5

Slow Horses (Slough House #1 of 4), by Mick Herron @@@@ (4 out of 5) The spies who work out of Slough House are “a post-useful crew of misfits [who] can be stored and left to gather dust.” Every one of them. MI5 has dumped them all there after they screwed up royally. Now they… Read More ›

Uncovering corruption at Scotland Yard

Garden of Lamentations (Duncan Kincaid/Gemma James #17), by Deborah Crombie @@@@ (4 out of 5) Let me see if I’ve got this straight. There are lots of cops in Deborah Crombie’s latest detective novel, Garden of Lamentations. Six of them, for starters. Co-protagonists Detective Superintendent Duncan Kincaid and Detective Inspector Gemma James are married. They’ve… Read More ›

A spy story that will keep you guessing

The Travelers: A Novel, by Chris Pavone @@@@@ (5 out of 5) In his third novel, The Travelers, Chris Pavone weaves a tale so baffling that you’re likely to be shocked again and again as the truth at the heart of the story gradually floats to the surface. Once again, as in his previous books,… Read More ›

Another great detective novel from Jacqueline Winspear

The Mapping of Love and Death (Maisie Dobbs #7), by Jacqueline Winspear @@@@@ (5 out of 5) It’s 1932, Maisie Dobbs’ third year in business as an “inquiry agent.” (That’s British for private detective.) As usual, Maisie’s life is complicated. Her assistant, Billy Beale, is working shorter hours to care for his wife, who has… Read More ›

Going undercover for the CIA in ISIS

The Prisoner (John Wells #11), by Alex Berenson @@@@@ (5 out of 5) To uncover the identity of a mole in the CIA, John Wells must go undercover again. A long time earlier, he had spent years with Al Qaeda in Afghanistan and Pakistan. At the time, he was the CIA’s only source of first-hand… Read More ›

The first in a series of great detective novels

Knots and Crosses (Inspector Rebus #1), by Ian Rankin @@@@@ (5 out of 5) John Rebus makes his debut as a Detective Sergeant in the Edinburgh police in Knots and Crosses. He’s been on the force for fifteen years following a decorated career in the British Army and, for a time, in the original special… Read More ›

The joy of San Francisco noir

Dead Irish (Dismas Hardy #1), by John Lescroart @@@@@ (5 out of 5) San Francisco bartender Dismas Hardy was briefly a patrol officer in the SFPD while he worked toward a law degree. He left the law shortly after the death of an infant son and divorce from his wife. But when his boss and… Read More ›

The original hard-boiled detective?

Red Harvest (Continental Op #1), by Dashiell Hammett @@@@ (4 out of 5) Maybe he wasn’t the original hard-boiled detective. But he was certainly among the first. His creator, Dashiell Hammett, called him “the Continental op.” And the New York Times termed Hammett “the dean of the… ‘hard-boiled’ school of detective fiction” in its obituary… Read More ›

“The godmother of modern Norwegian crime fiction”

Blind Goddess (Hanne Wilhelmsen #1), by Anne Holt @@ (2 out of 5) Blind Goddess is the first of nine entries to date in Anne Holt’s series of detective novels featuring Oslo Detective Inspector Hanne Wilhelmsen. I don’t plan to read any of the rest of them. When Jo Nesbø proclaimed Holt “the godmother of… Read More ›